Nursing Administration

Nursing Administration

Nursing administration involves executive and management supervisory titles. The term is broad, and it refers to knowledgeable nursing professionals who understand leadership practices and their relation to the nursing profession. The nurse administrator design, manage and facilitate the delivery of patient care in different healthcare settings. More so, the concept of nursing administration structures the nursing profession to support nurses’ presence for patients and their families. Nursing administration presents a wide range of career opportunities as an individual can work in healthcare centers, hospitals, nursing homes, long-term care facilities, and public health agencies.
Nursing leadership involves the encompassing of a hierarchy with three significant levels. The first level consists of First Line Nurse Managers, who are the professionals responsible for first-level nursing services oversight (Marianne at al. 2). The middle nurse Managers oversee multiple units within a facility, and they include case managers, coordinators, and clinical nurse managers. The nurse executives are professionals responsible for providing directions on patient care services in a facility and patient-care delivery systems design (Marianne et al. 3). The executive includes executive vice presidents in nursing and nursing directors. The general responsibilities of nursing administrators are knowledge and implementation of nursing procedures in healthcare environments. Further, administrators communicate with patients and manage teams that carry out the primary interactions with patients in the facility to make inquiries and provide a comfortable environment for treatment (Abraham and Scaria 162). Staff development and ensuring that nurses comply with departmental regulations are also responsibilities of administrators, along with the establishment of procedures and give team members guidelines to learn the methods.
Nursing administration requires leaders to have specific skills. Orientation to details in every case is critical to ensure that nurses work under the coordination and perform their duties effectively. Analytical and technology skills, and strong interpersonal communication are important in nursing administration as they ensure team harmony and reliable health care provision.

References
Abraham, J., and J. Scaria. “Emotional intelligence: the context for successful nursing leadership: A literature review.” Nurse Care Open Acces J 2.6 (2017): 160-164.
Marianne, F., and L. M. Fagerstrom. “Ethical model-A synthesis between caring sciences and nursing administration.” J Nurs Care 5.358 (2016): 2167-1168.